Deep yellow daylily with red center and green leaves against a brick wall
Yellow Daylily


Beyond Surviving: Suggestions for Survivors

by Iris M. Bolton

(Especially for newly bereaved parents)

  1. Know you can survive; you may not think so, but you can.

2. Struggle with “why” it happened until you no longer need to know “why” or until YOU are satisfied with partial answers.

3. Know you may feel overwhelmed by the intensity of your feelings but that all your feelings are normal.

4. Anger, guilt, confusion, forgetfulness are common responses. You are not crazy, you are in mourning.

5. Be aware you may feel appropriate anger at the person, at the world, at God, at yourself. It’s okay to express it.

Two Pink Roses on a Rose bush with vivid green leaves in the background
Two Pink Roses

6. You may feel guilty for what you think you did or did not do. Guilt can turn into regret, through forgiveness.

7. Having suicidal thoughts is common. It does not mean that you will act on those thoughts.


8. Remember to take one moment or one day at a time.9. Find a good listener with whom to share. Call someone if you need to talk.

10. Don’t be afraid to cry. Tears are healing.

Beautiful pink daylily with bright yellow center and varying shades of pink as the petals extend outward
Peach Daylily

11. Give yourself time to heal.

12. Remember, the choice was not yours. No one is the sole influence on another’s life.

13. Expect setbacks. If emotions return like a tidal wave, you may only be experiencing a remnant of grief, an unfinished piece.

14. Try to put off major decisions.

15. Give yourself permission to get professional help.

Hybrid "Good as Gold" rose in shades of yellow and peach on  rose bush with background green leaves
Hybrid Tea Rose

16. Be aware of the pain in your family and friends.

17. Be patient with yourself and others who may not understand.

18. Set your own limits and learn to say no.

19. Steer clear of people who want to tell you what or how to feel.

20. Know that there are support groups that can be helpful, such as Compassionate Friends or Survivors of Suicide groups. If not, ask a professional to start one.

Cluster of pink resurrection Lillies with yellow centers and wet with fresh rain. burning bush in the background
Resurrection Lillies

21. Call on your personal faith to help you through.

22. It is common to experience physical reaction to your grief, e.g. headaches, loss of appetite, inability to sleep.

23. The willingness to laugh with other and at yourself is healing.

24. Wear out your questions, anger, guilt, or other feelings until you can let them go. Letting go doesn’t mean forgetting.

25. Know that you will never be the same again, but you can survive and even go beyond just surviving.


Reprinted with permission from Suicide and its Aftermath (Dunne, McIntosh, Dunne-Maxim, Norton

White Dove in Flight with Wings Open
That Peace Might Find Us All

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